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(02) 9841 4444

• Information and support • Social connections • Advocacy

Our Why

We work to support all people with Down syndrome to achieve their full potential in all life stages. 
We champion the rights of people with Down syndrome to be valued and to take their rightful place in the community.

Your Support

The work we do is not possible without your generous support. If you wish to support the work we do and make a donation, you can do so online or please phone us on 02 9841 4444.

Our Impact

The Down Syndrome Association of NSW was established in 1980 by parents of young people with Down syndrome. As the children of the founding members grew to adolescence and adulthood, so too our services extended to all life stages. We now provide information and support, advocacy, capacity building workshops, training in schools, community participation programs, pre-natal expert advice, new parent resources and support and specialist employment preparation and connection.

We are an enthusiastic team of professionals with expertise in our relevant fields of service provision, support and advocacy.  Some of us have lived experience with a family member with Down syndrome, some bring a range of expertise and industry experience.  We are here to support you – all working together to help our members with Down syndrome achieve their full potential.

Down Syndrome NSW accepts membership via phone 9841 4444 or email. Once we receive your request, it will be presented to our Board for approval, in line with our Constitution. Membership is free and you can find out more here

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YOUR STORIES
Tonight, we invite you to enjoy the wonderful and heartfelt story of Hannah and her family, shared with us by her amazing mum Lee. The Meyers family are based in Central West NSW.

MEET THE MEYERS
Hello to everybody reading this. I cant believe its been over 15 years since I have shared our now 30 year old daughter Hannahs journey in life.

We have been a part of the Down Syndrome Association NSW since Hannah was born and during that time have shared many of her milestones and had the privilege of being a part of the DVD Parent to Parent back in the day of videos!

So let me reintroduce ourselves. We are the Meyers family consisting of myself Lee, my husband Wayne, our son Joshua and Miss Hannah who has Down Syndrome.

If only I had a crystal ball 30 years ago it would have saved me from crying unnecessary tears. Believe me there were plenty. It would have saved me feeling lost and alone when in fact I had a network behind me I just couldnt see . A husband whos love for the daughter I felt Id lost made me feel guilty oh so much guilt at times it consumed me. 

All such wasted time when in fact we were blessed to be given someone whos love and outlook on life has given us far more than can we say looking through Hannahs eyes our world is a wonderful place, yes even through COVID.

The best advice we received was Hannah is Hannah first and foremost. Down Syndrome is a label the professionals have given her, she will achieve at her own pace.

I still carry this advice when we are met with challenges or those that see her physical appearance and not her soul. 

Hannah was the first to attend our local Catholic primary school without any aid! Oh the battle we had to enroll her was so worth it. She graduated from MacKillop College in 2010 not as  dux but an educator in love, acceptance and being a valued member of society.

Whilst at school, Hannah commenced working at the Catholic education office one day week and 12 years later, she is still there.

After school Hannah struggled, she started to attend a local disability service day program and on the first day she told us she couldnt go back because they all had a disability. 

When we told her she also had a disability she was gobsmacked it was then we realised she honestly had never seen herself in that way. She said I have Down Syndrome is that a disability! Smile we did.

Hannah has now been a part of this service for 6 years.

Hannahs dream was to be a Radio Host and with the support of our local community Radio 2MCEfm 92.3. Hannahs Good Time Music show was born. Each Friday at 1pm Hannah and her two supports (Liam & Brayden) present Hannahs Good Time Music live with music and karaoke singalong.

They entertain the Central West and beyond. She has had our Mayor and many local artists joining the show.

Hannah leads a busy life doing what Hannah loves.

We now face the next stage of Hannahs life and the knowledge that we too are growing older and with this ensuring Hannahs needs will be met but not just yet we will continue to take one day at a time and keep living life through Hannahs eyes focusing on the day not tomorrow.

Thank you for sharing, Lee. If youd like to share your story, wed love to hear from you. Please email Emily at media@dsansw.org.au with your story and photos to share.

YOUR STORIESTonight, we invite you to enjoy the wonderful and heartfelt story of Hannah and her family, shared with us by her amazing mum Lee. The Meyers family are based in Central West NSW.MEET THE MEYERSHello to everybody reading this. I can't believe it's been over 15 years since I have shared our now 30 year old daughter Hannah's journey in life.We have been a part of the Down Syndrome Association NSW since Hannah was born and during that time have shared many of her milestones and had the privilege of being a part of the DVD Parent to Parent back in the day of videos!So let me reintroduce ourselves. We are the Meyers family consisting of myself Lee, my husband Wayne, our son Joshua and Miss Hannah who has Down Syndrome.If only I had a crystal ball 30 years ago it would have saved me from crying unnecessary tears. Believe me there were plenty. It would have saved me feeling lost and alone when in fact I had a network behind me I just couldn't see . A husband who's love for the daughter I felt I'd lost made me feel guilty oh so much guilt at times it consumed me. All such wasted time when in fact we were blessed to be given someone who's love and outlook on life has given us far more than can we say looking through Hannah's eyes our world is a wonderful place, yes even through COVID.The best advice we received was "Hannah is Hannah first and foremost". Down Syndrome is a label the professionals have given her, she will achieve at her own pace.I still carry this advice when we are met with challenges or those that see her physical appearance and not her soul. Hannah was the first to attend our local Catholic primary school without any aid! Oh the battle we had to enroll her was so worth it. She graduated from MacKillop College in 2010 not as dux but an educator in love, acceptance and being a valued member of society.Whilst at school, Hannah commenced working at the Catholic education office one day week and 12 years later, she is still there.After school Hannah struggled, she started to attend a local disability service day program and on the first day she told us she couldn't go back because they all had a disability. When we told her she also had a disability she was gobsmacked it was then we realised she honestly had never seen herself in that way. She said I have Down Syndrome is that a disability! Smile we did.Hannah has now been a part of this service for 6 years.Hannah's dream was to be a Radio Host and with the support of our local community Radio 2MCEfm 92.3. Hannah's Good Time Music show was born. Each Friday at 1pm Hannah and her two supports (Liam & Brayden) present Hannah's Good Time Music live with music and karaoke singalong.They entertain the Central West and beyond. She has had our Mayor and many local artists joining the show.Hannah leads a busy life doing what Hannah loves.We now face the next stage of Hannah's life and the knowledge that we too are growing older and with this ensuring Hannah's needs will be met but "not just yet" we will continue to take one day at a time and keep living life through Hannah's eyes focusing on the day not tomorrow.Thank you for sharing, Lee. If you'd like to share your story, we'd love to hear from you. Please email Emily at media@dsansw.org.au with your story and photos to share. ... See MoreSee Less

1 day ago

Comment on Facebook 162973473715851_4734984879847998

Yeah Hannah! From your friend Reggiej

You are wonderful Lee.

Love this 🧡🧡🧡

DOWN SYNDROME x ALZHEIMERS DISEASE
Studies show that by the age of 40, almost 100% of people with Down syndrome who die have the changes in the brain associated with Alzheimer’s disease. 

Amyloid precursor protein (APP), which is the abnormal breakdown that yields the toxic amyloid protein that forms plaques in the brain and probably damages brain cells and their connections, is coded for chromosome 21. 

Because people with Down syndrome have an extra copy of chromosome 21, they make 1.5 times as much APP as other people, and this seems to result in an excess tendency for the abnormal amyloid breakdown product to build up. This appears to cause earlier appearance of the brain changes typical of Alzheimer’s disease. However, a significant number of people with Down syndrome are older than 40 and show no signs of having Alzheimer’s disease. 

It is not currently understood why changes to the brain that are typical of Alzheimer’s disease do not necessarily produce the condition in people with Down syndrome.

On World Alzheimers Disease Day and Dementia Action Week, learn more here thanks to Dementia Australia:
https://www.dementia.org.au/about-dementia/types-of-dementia/down-syndrome-and-alzheimers-disease

DOWN SYNDROME x ALZHEIMER'S DISEASEStudies show that by the age of 40, almost 100% of people with Down syndrome who die have the changes in the brain associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Amyloid precursor protein (APP), which is the abnormal breakdown that yields the toxic amyloid protein that forms plaques in the brain and probably damages brain cells and their connections, is coded for chromosome 21. Because people with Down syndrome have an extra copy of chromosome 21, they make 1.5 times as much APP as other people, and this seems to result in an excess tendency for the abnormal amyloid breakdown product to build up. This appears to cause earlier appearance of the brain changes typical of Alzheimer’s disease. However, a significant number of people with Down syndrome are older than 40 and show no signs of having Alzheimer’s disease. It is not currently understood why changes to the brain that are typical of Alzheimer’s disease do not necessarily produce the condition in people with Down syndrome.On World Alzheimer's Disease Day and Dementia Action Week, learn more here thanks to Dementia Australia:https://dementia.org.au/about-dementia/… ... See MoreSee Less

1 day ago

We just love this perspective! Hoorah! 🧡

We just love this perspective! Hoorah! 🧡 ... See MoreSee Less

1 day ago

Comment on Facebook We just love this ...

I actually contemplated this thought very deeply after my son, Cash, was born. How did we know he had one 'extra'? Maybe I didn't have enough! Thanks for the memory ❤🙂

We sure are. What a beautiful smile. That smile has made my day!

Soo adorable.

Love this!!

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Street address: Level 6/410 Church St North Parramatta NSW 2151
Postal address: PO Box 3173 North Parramatta NSW 1750
Office Hours: Monday – Thursday 9:00am – 4:00pm

Phone: (02) 9841 4444
Toll free: 1800 811 629
Email: admin@dsansw.org.au

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